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JENNIFER SEAMAN

Call: 2007   

+44 (0)20 7306 0102jseaman@wilberforce.co.uk

Practice Overview

Jennifer practices in chancery and commercial litigation, with an emphasis on pensions, trusts, probate and estates, and professional negligence litigation.

For several years, Jennifer has been recommended as a Leading Junior in the field of Pensions in Chambers & Partners and in The Legal 500.  She has been described in the 2022 editions as:

“Simply excellent. Very thorough, approachable and has excellent technical knowledge.”

In previous years she has been described by the directories as: “extremely assiduous and considered, very thorough, careful and creative” (2021), “extremely bright, takes care to absorb the detail of the case and is proactive and very reliable.  Also diligent, hardworking and able to work well with counsel from other sets.” (2021), “bright, responsive and human” (2020), “very experienced and a delight to work with” (2020), a “well-balanced junior who forms a clear opinion and communicates it clearly” (2019), “an absolute pleasure to deal with, extremely intelligent, self-assured, quietly confident and firm in her views” (2018) and “absolutely fabulous.  She has the ear of the judge when she speaks.” (2017).

Jennifer is recommended in Who’s Who Legal’s UK Bar Private Client category and is described as “a very hardworking junior” who possesses “an excellent knowledge of trusts law, combined with impressive commercial judgement”.

Jennifer is appointed to the Attorney General’s B Panel. Through this appointment, she advises a number of government departments and agencies (including the Ministry of Justice, the Ministry of Defence, the Home Office and the Department of Work and Pensions) on issues concerning trusts, pensions and commercial litigation.

Jennifer was instructed on two high-profile Supreme Court cases: Futter v HMRC [2013] UKSC 26 (heard with Pitt v Holt, on the ‘rule in Re Hastings-Bass’, trustee powers and mistaken dispositions) and Benedetti v Sawiris [2013] UKSC 50 (restitution and quantum meruit awards).